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The future of learning media is digital

The Danish government invests in digital learning media to the primary and lower secondary schools and educational publisher Alinea is a part of this process towards a digital future. 

Digital learning media are a never-ending topic of conversation at the Alinea office. It is an important topic in the public sector as well, and the Danish government has earmarked EUR 67 million to strengthen IT in primary and lower secondary schools from 2012 to 2015. In 2013 no less than EUR 11 million was granted in subsidies for digital learning media which reflects the huge interest in the field.

Alinea's newly appointed publishing director Cliff Hansen sees the potential in the digital future.

"We're in the throes of a pressing digital trend ushering in monumental changes. We must be sure our business is ready to meet these changes in the right way and cement our leading position for the future," comments Cliff Hansen.

The market for digital learning media is growing but the progress is slower then expected. This is due to several factors. The schools are not yet ready for the adjustment, the right IT structure needs some tweaking and the schools are also preoccupied with Denmark's forthcoming educational reform. Alinea is focused on the challenges that arise on the way to a school culture of digital learning materials.

"We must gain a better understanding of teachers so we can meet their greatest needs spot-on. We have to be the most adept at understanding the market challenges and capturing market shares, even if the market isn't growing at the pace we would like. That's our future challenge," says Cliff Hansen.

The major focus on digital learning media does not mean that Alinea has forgotten the analogue media. It is still the analogue learning media that generate by far the bulk of educational publisher's revenue.

"We're not really that concerned about whether it's one or the other. In some cases, analogue learning materials still have the edge, while digital media constitute a supplement. We are solely concerned with developing content that schools can use to help students acquire new skills," Cliff Hansen concludes.